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When it comes to buying a treadmill the worst thing you could do is jump head first into the first "special deal" that comes your way.

There are a number of different treadmill manufacturers and suppliers that produce a vast array of different quality treadmills. This article will hopefully clear the confusion by providing a detailed treadmill comparison so that you can make an informed buying decision.

In the past treadmill comparisons have been primarily comparing two different models or brands.

However I feel this produces a false impression of the different treadmill features and relative quality. By taking a look at a number of different brands however you can get a more realistic idea of the advantages of each brand. Only then can you make you own buying decision based on your specific needs.

I''ve done the research and compared some of the best treadmill manufacturers around

so that you don''t have to. So without further ado..If you are looking for a compact treadmill for the corner of the room or if you only have a small room for your fitness equipment then Universal and Tunturi treadmills are a great choice.

They are either convienently small or folding so that they can be stored away if needed. At between $1,300 and $1,700 they are a good choice if space is an issue.

If you are thinking about buying a new treadmill but feel that the prices are a bit steep then why not consider a refurbished treadmill. These treadmills are often upto 50% of the new retail price but look and feel like the new models. The Precor C962i treadmill, StarTrac TR4500HR treadmill and Lifestride 9100HRT Style treadmill are all refurbished treadmills that have received rave reviews from customers.

If you are not wanting to pay top dollar but also don''t want to lose anything in quality then these treadmills are a serious option. Visit my website below for the best supplier of these machines and a special bonus offer.

If you are looking for a treadmill with lots of interactive features then you must check out the Precor and Pro-Form treadmills. They are both trusted manufacturers that have been around for ages. They produce some of the good quality treadmills and include many special features that satisfy even the most demanding user. Highly recommended!

If you are looking for a commercial treadmill that can withstand the rigours or continual use then

fitnessbringshealth treadmill
take a look at Star Trac treadmills. If you have ever been into your local gymnasium you will sure have seen these machines. They are true work horses, perfect for either a commercial setting or for the serious treadmill user.

Another option in this category is the Life Fitness treadmill range these are generally slightly cheaper than the Star Trac machines so if money is a problem then this range is for you.

If you are just getting back into exercising after a long lay off or you are new to it all and are overweight then you may want to look at the Noramco treadmills which have a maximum user capacity of 600lb!!! They have extended warranties, super durable with powerful motors. However you will have to dip into your pockets to get yourself one. At over $4,500 each, quality doesn''t come cheap!

If you are a serious treadmill user and/or don''t want a machine that is going to last the distance then Endurance treadmills are a good bet. They are built to last with an exclusive in-home lifetime warranty that covers every inch of the machine forever!! These treadmills just keep going and going.

So there you have it. A detailed look at many of the common specification and features that people ask about when buying a treadmill. Remember however that I have only really scratched the surface with these treadmill comparisons. There are a number of other brands I have not mentioned that are well worth a look like Smooth Fitness which I cover in more detail on my website.

Dean Iggo is a keen fitness enthusiast and home gym user. He is also the webmaster of http://www.home-gym-buyers-guide.com a website providing unbiased ratings on treadmills and home gym tips.

When it comes to buying a treadmill the worst thing you could do is jump head first into the first "special deal" that comes your way. There are a number of different treadmill manufacturers and suppliers that produce a vast array of different quality treadmills. This article will hopefully clear the confusion by providing a detailed treadmill comparison so that you can make an informed buying decision.

In the past treadmill comparisons have been primarily comparing two different models or brands. However I feel this produces a false impression of the different treadmill features and relative quality. By taking a look at a number of different brands however you can get a more realistic idea of the advantages of each brand. Only then can you make you own buying decision based on your specific needs.

I''ve done the research and compared some of the best treadmill manufacturers around so that you don''t have to. So without further ado...

If you are looking for a compact treadmill for the corner of the room or if you only have a small room for your fitness equipment then Universal and Tunturi treadmills are a great choice. They are either convienently small or folding so that they can be stored away if needed. At between $1,300 and $1,700 they are a good choice if space is an issue.

If you are thinking about buying a new treadmill but feel that the prices are a bit steep then why not consider a refurbished treadmill. These treadmills are often upto 50% of the new retail price but look and feel like the new models. The Precor C962i treadmill, StarTrac TR4500HR treadmill and Lifestride 9100HRT Style treadmill are all refurbished treadmills that have received rave reviews from customers.

If you are not wanting to pay top dollar but also don''t want to lose anything in quality then these treadmills are a serious option. Visit my website below for the best supplier of these machines and a special bonus offer.

If you are looking for a treadmill with lots of interactive features then you must check out the Precor and Pro-Form treadmills. They are both trusted manufacturers that have been around for ages. They produce some of the good quality treadmills and include many special features that satisfy even the most demanding user. Highly recommended!

If you are looking for a commercial treadmill that can withstand the rigours or continual use then take a look at Star Trac treadmills. If you have ever been into your local gymnasium you will sure have seen these machines. They are true work horses, perfect for either a commercial setting or for the serious treadmill user.

Another option in this category is the Life Fitness treadmill range these are generally slightly cheaper than the Star Trac machines so if money is a problem then this range is for you.

If you are just getting back into exercising after a long lay off or you are new to it all and are overweight then you may want to look at the Noramco treadmills which have a maximum user capacity of 600lb!!! They have extended warranties, super durable with powerful motors. However you will have to dip into your pockets to get yourself one. At over $4,500 each, quality doesn''t come cheap!

If you are a serious treadmill user and/or don''t want a machine that is going to last the distance then Endurance treadmills are a good bet. They are built to last with an exclusive in-home lifetime warranty that covers every inch of the machine forever!! These treadmills just keep going and going.

So there you have it. A detailed look at many of the common specification and features that people ask about when buying a treadmill. Remember however that I have only really scratched the surface with these treadmill comparisons. There are a number of other brands I have not mentioned that are well worth a look like Smooth Fitness which I cover in more detail on my website.

Dean Iggo is a keen fitness enthusiast and home gym user. He is also the webmaster of http://www.home-gym-buyers-guide.com a website providing unbiased ratings on treadmills and home gym tips.

“Consumer is the King,” they say. In olden times, the King had a number of wise Ministers, whose counsel he took to decide important issues. Now, you have an all important issue before you- buying a treadmill. Presently, your counselor is the internet. You know what it is to search on the internet. Many a times, it is confusion confounded!

Instead of the solutions, fresh doubts are created in your mind. In such a situation, the best alternative for you is the treadmill ratings by the consumers. The indicators provided by several consumers will be of much help to you. Ratings are generally given by the consumers, feature by feature, and you get the ratings in a tabulated form, in the treadmill review magazines. Such clear-cut and concise information helps you take a decision.

The ratings generally pertain to:

1. Each brand and model of treadmills.

2. Safety statistics

3. Heart rate monitor

4. Merits of the interactive model

5. Computer fitness programs and levels.

Such ratings are available in the fitness magazines. Comparison is between models of equal standing. A model costing $5000 can never be compared with the model costing $ 500.

You are a lover of a treadmill; you are not the technical expert. It is better to compare the ratings with the information available in the catalog published by the treadmill manufacturer.

Whether it simply the repetition…In that case, the review is not of much worth from your point of view. The ratings must be the result of independent verification, by the reviewer. It should not be a hired review of a yellow journalist.

Where do you read the ratings, is also important. Websites generally, earmark the space for consumer’s opinion. If it is company’s website, you generally get the praise for the product only- it could even be a tutored praise. Search for the independent website and read the customer’s woes carefully. You are likely to get feature by feature report, if you read some reviews. Their problems could be your tools and inputs for taking the proper decision.

Another important issue that must demand your attention is the after sales service. Machinery is machinery. The best of the machine may breakdown. If the company has a reputation for the best after sales service and when they promptly repair/replace your treadmill, you could yet be the satisfied customer.

Don’t simply read the ratings…Understand them and try to grasp their implications!

http://www.treadmill-online.com/home/ & Treadmill website provides detailed information on treadmill, treadmills, treadmill benefits, treadmill exercises and more.

Many people who are considering a workout regimen often have a tough decision between whether they should use an elliptical trainer or a treadmill. Both machines can be an effective tool for weight loss, improved fitness and overall better health.

Deciding on which machine is best for you can be a daunting task and you can get many different answers depending upon whom you talk to. Certain fitness professionals will recommend that elliptical trainer over a treadmill while other professionals will clearly recommend a treadmill for what they feel is obvious reasons.

Personally I feel an elliptical trainer is the better choice. Elliptical trainers provide more of a well rounded work out, allowing you to do more in less time. Treadmills on the other hand are basically just an indoor running machine, allowing you to mimic running without having to deal with the normal hassles of dodging traffic and weather conditions.

From a pure price standpoint treadmills are more affordable than elliptical trainers. If you are tight on a budget and yet want a piece of equipment which can work out on indoors then a treadmill might be best for you. On the other hand if you want a more well-rounded machine and elliptical trainer is the perfect choice for you.

On a final note, some people prefer going to the gym to work out. The gym offers more of structured regimen where working out at home can get sidetracked by distractions such as family, friends or the telephone.

Ultimately, it comes down to your personal preferences, budget, fitness goals and desires. Only you can decide which machine if any at all are best for you. Be sure not to take this lightly as you do not want to waste money on a machine you may not use or a gym membership that she may not take advantage of.

Elliptical Trainers Ratings - Free for your information

Building strength: "when I step on the treadmill, my heart no longer feels like it''s going to come careening out of my chest."
Shape,by Imani A. Dawson

I figured that the exercise component of this weight-loss program I''m on would be the easy part. As a card-carrying (but not necessarily active) gym member since the age of 17, I''ve enjoyed intermittent spurts of faithful attendance, so I just assumed I was in pretty good shape--at least until I stepped into the Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma (NISMAT) at Lenox Hill Hospital to take my fitness test.

Thirty-five seconds into running on a treadmill during the test''s peak stage, I felt like I was going to collapse. My chest was heaving, my thighs were burning and I saw my life flash before my eyes. I had to stop. Though NISMAT tester Chris Murphy assured me that my results were normal for someone of my age and weight, I was still disappointed. Four years ago I could run five miles in 46 minutes; now, 6 1/2 minutes on a treadmill set me wheezing. Suddenly, I wasn''t so confident that I''d be able to ace the physical component.

Working out at the Chelsea Piers Sports Center, a 150,000-square-foot fitness palace in the heart of New York''s Chelsea Piers Sports & Entertainment Complex, quickly allayed my fears. The center boasts more equipment than I''ve ever seen in one place. And then there''s my trainer, Christa Pryor (in photo, right), a 5-foot-11-inch combo of West Coast friendliness and drill-sergeant zeal. She smiles a whole lot but won''t let me skimp on my squats or dips. My legs, arms and chest burn for days after our weekly workouts.

Classes and cardio-machine exercise supplement my weight training. I''m a klutz, and classes like Speed Rope are much more alluring on paper than when I''m struggling to crisscross my arms and keep up with the instructor''s cheerful commands from the back of the room. So because of my natural propensity to trip over my own feet, I''ve found cardio workouts on the elliptical to be much less comical and more effective. I also do interval training--which my trainer confirmed burns up to nine times more calories than a single steady pace--for 45 minutes to an hour, four to five times a week.

Prior to taking on this diary, I would use anything from a heated argument with a friend to a deadline as a reason not to exercise. As much as I dreamed about being fit, it just wasn''t a priority. I was more focused on building my freelance career while working two jobs. Now, I view exercise as part of my "assignment," so I don''t make excuses to avoid the gym. Exercising for the story has helped me realize that if I want to maintain a healthy weight, I''ve got to get my body moving at least four times a week.

While I''m not quite up to running the New York City Marathon (or even three miles, for that matter), I''m feeling stronger and fitter every day. My arms are beginning to show definition, my thighs and waist look firmer, and I''m starting to fit back into the size 10s stashed in the recesses of my closet. More important, when I step on the treadmill, my heart no longer feels like it''s going to come careening out of my chest. I know that I still have far to go on my journey to fitness, but I''ve come a long way, baby.

RELATED ARTICLE

then

month 1 Height: 5''4"

Weight: 179 lbs.

Body fat: 32%

V[O.sub.2] max*: 33.7 ml/kg/min

Aerobic fitness: average

Resting blood pressure: 114/80 (normal)

Cholesterol: 145 (normal)

month 2 Weight: 173 lbs.

Pounds lost: 6

Body fat: 30%

Body fat lost: 2%

now

month 3

Weight: 170 lbs.

Pounds lost: 9

Body fat: 28%

Body fat lost: 4%

RELATED ARTICLE: WHAT I LEARNED

1. The right environment can be a key motivational tool for maintaining a workout regimen.

2. Interval training is more effective at burning calories than keeping a steady pace.

3. Sticking with a consistent workout schedule means making exercise a priority.

COPYRIGHT Weider Publications
COPYRIGHT Gale Group

Maximize your workout: how to burn the most calories on the bike, treadmill, elliptical and stair climber, Shape, by Karen Asp

April''s showers may prompt you to move your workout routine indoors, but that shouldn''t dampen your fitness progress. Whether you prefer the stationary bike, treadmill, elliptical trainer or stair climber, the trick to burning more calories is avoiding common mistakes involving form, speed and resistance, says Jay Blahnik, a certified fitness professional in Laguna Beach, Calif., and a spokesman for the Nautilus health and fitness group. Here are the top nine cardio-machine blunders, plus simple strategies for working out smarter.

* stationary bike

DON''T: Pedal like a maniac.

DO: Add resistance and slow your speed, shooting to keep your cadence at 70-80 revolutions per minute (RPMs). "Once you hit 100 RPMs, caloric expenditure goes down," Blahnik says. "When you''re pedaling that fast, you''re probably not using enough resistance to challenge yourself."

DON''T: Let discomfort cut your workout short.

DO: Be sure to get the seat position right. Whether you''re on an upright or recumbent bike, adjust the seat so your knees have a slight bend when your leg is fully extended (on the recumbent, sit with your lower back against the seat when checking knee position). Also, on an upright, resist sitting up tall and holding the front of the handlebars. Instead, round over the handlebars to take the pressure off your lower back and increase circulation in your legs, says Bryan Green, president of Advantage Fitness Products in Los Angeles. If the seat has you wriggling because it''s too hard or narrow, invest in a pair of padded cycling shorts or get a good gel seat cover.

* treadmill

DON''T: Run at a walking pace.

DO: Walk taking quick steps, driving your elbows back as you move. If you run at less than 4.5 mph, you''ll burn fewer calories than walking at that pace.

DON''T: Run with short steps.

DO: Lengthen your stride and speed up slightly. Once you hit your running speed, anywhere from 4.7-8.0 mph, don''t cheat by taking short steps--a frequent mistake when runners move indoors. "Short steps slow you down," Blahnik says, "so you''re burning fewer calories."

DON''T: Keep it flat.

DO: Add a 4 percent incline. You may not feel much of a difference, but you''ll see an increase in calories expended on the display, especially if you''re walking. "Because most walkers have a tough time going faster, they can work harder by using the incline feature," Blahnik says.

* elliptical trainer

DON''T: Monitor intensity by how fast you''re going.

DO: Gauge exertion by your breathing. "Because they''re moving so much, most people think they''re working much harder on an elliptical than they actually are," Blahnik says. During a vigorous workout, your breathing should be labored.

DON''T: Up the speed to push yourself harder.

DO: Add resistance and/or change the ramp position. Speed will help you burn calories, but only to a point. Once you begin moving out of control, you''re unable to work harder and you end up sapping fewer calories. Resistance does the job better, while various ramp settings allow you to challenge different muscles for more of an overall workout, Green says.

* stair climber

DON''T: Sacrifice your form.

DO: Keep your body upright with your hands lightly touching the machine. Leaning heavily on the handlebars so you can go faster only decreases how hard your legs must work, cutting the calories expended. For a greater challenge, don''t touch the supports at all, and pump your arms. If this is too difficult, alternate between holding on for a minute and letting go for a minute.

DON''T: Take shallow steps.

DO: Deepen your step, even if that means slowing down. Taking fast, shallow steps might seem like you''re racking up the number of calories you''re expending, but these machines figure on an 8- to 10-inch-deep step each time. Do less than that and you''ll fire fewer muscles, cheating the calorie burn.

Karen Asp is a health and fitness writer whose favorite cardio machines are the treadmill and Nordic Track.

COPYRIGHT Weider Publications
COPYRIGHT Gale Group

Treadmill endurance records: call it a great leap forward for running in place
Muscle & Fitness/Hers,by John Hanc


After about 15 years of little progress (or interest), the world records for treadmill endurance running have been broken and reset four times in just three months--and women own three of the records.

It started Jan. 24-25, when ultramarathoner Serge Arbona--running on a treadmill at the Towson YMCA in Maryland, where he lives--completed 152.27 miles in 24 hours.

Three weeks later, on Feb. 12-13, Monica Scholz, a Canadian distance runner known for doing 100-mile trail runs (she has completed more than 65 in her career), easily broke the existing women''s 24-hour world record of 98 miles. As part of a fund-raiser for a children''s hospital in Toronto, she completed 100 miles in just 20 hours. At that point Scholz, an attorney, got off the treadmill because she had to get back to work.

Finally, on March 8-9, a Hungarian woman, Edit Berces, ran roughshod over both records. On a treadmill in a fitness center in Budapest, Berces, age 40, completed 153.6 miles in 24 hours.

So what''s with the rush to get into the Guinness Book of World Records for running nowhere? Some say it''s because the existing records were soft; others claim it''s because of the popularity of treadmill running--and its inherent challenges. "Everyone has run on a treadmill and probably has had difficulty being motivated for even half an hour," says long-distance treadmill runner David Deubelbeiss, who helped organize the Toronto record attempt.

Scholz, who is legally blind, did it by simply tuning out. "I put my glasses on top of my head and turned up my MP3 player," says the 36-year-old.

"I felt like a caged bird," says Berces, who averaged 6.4 mph over 24 hours.

Distractions didn''t faze Scholz, whose Cybex treadmill was set up in the atrium of the Hospital for Sick Children in downtown Toronto. But it might have rattled Deubelbeiss, who, in an attempt to break the overall world record, was running on a treadmill next to her. "After four hours, he started complaining that it was too hot," Scholz remembers. "I said, ''David, this is a hospital for sick children, so we can''t ask them to turn down the heat.'' He didn''t laugh."

"I erred and thought I was Superman," admits Deubelbeiss, who nonetheless set a Canadian record of 136.09 miles that day.

COPYRIGHT Weider Publications
COPYRIGHT Gale Group


Lose weight with a treadmill: I need to drop some weight. What''s a good beginner''s treadmill workout?… and more of your questions answered here
Shape, by Suzanne Schlosberg


Q I haven''t exercised in years and really want to boost my energy and lose weight. What''s a good treadmill workout for beginners?

A To prevent injury and burnout and to make sure you''re successful in your new endeavor, "begin by doing less than you think you can do," advises fitness consultant Gregory Florez, CEO of FitAdvisor.com in Salt Lake City and a spokesman for the American Council on Exercise: You''ll still feel an energy boost and burn calories. For most beginners, a good starting point is walking two to four times a week, gradually building from 10 minutes to 30 minutes at a comfortable pace. Florez recommends keeping a workout diary to track your fatigue and any soreness. "You shouldn''t be sore more than 24 hours after a workout," he says. If you are, you''re overdoing it. After every workout, gently stretch your hamstrings, calves and shins, holding for at least 30 seconds each without bouncing.

After four weeks of consistent exercise, start including intervals of higher-intensity exercise, either by cranking up the speed or by using the treadmill''s incline feature. For example, after a five-minute warm-up, alternate one minute at an intensity that leaves you slightly out of breath with one minute at a comfortable pace. After five to 15 minutes of these intervals, cool down for about five minutes.

Walking at 3 mph (a 20-minute-mile pace), a 145-pound woman burns about 110 calories in 30 minutes. At a 4-mph pace (a 15-minute-mile pace, one that a beginner probably couldn''t exceed, even during intervals), a 145-pound woman would burn about 160 calories in 30 minutes.

As you become more fit, increase your intervals so that you''re doing two to three minutes at a higher intensity for every minute of rest. "The body adapts quickly, so in order to keep progressing, it''s important to keep changing your workout," Florez says.

Q My fiance and I each have about 50 pounds to lose, and we would like to buy a treadmill. How much do we need to spend, and what features should we look for?

A A quality treadmill will run you at least $1,200, says Salt Lake City fitness consultant Gregory Florez. "Any treadmill that costs less is going to be underpowered and won''t have good, strong components that will last."

Rather than focus on bells and whistles such as preset programs, Florez advises first considering the warranty and sturdiness of the deck (the surface on which you walk/run), motor and frame. "The deck and belt should have a three- to five-year warranty," Florez says, "and the frame should have a lifetime warranty." Make sure the motor has a minimum of 1.8 horsepower, and the machine has a weight rating that exceeds your current weight as well as that of your fiance. (The weight rating can vary: Some treadmills can support as much as 350 pounds, while others hold only 250 pounds.) A large, readable display on the control console is also important.

Florez recommends shopping at a specialty fitness retailer "rather than a discount store that carries hockey pucks and hunting gear." Specialty shops generally have a more educated sales staff, higher-quality equipment and better warranties, and they can service your machine in the event it breaks down. They also offer 30-day, no-questions-asked return policies.

Wear your athletic shoes to the store and put the machine through its paces at a variety of inclines for 10-15 minutes. "Any treadmill sounds and feels good for two minutes," Florez says. It may take longer, however, to find out if a machine is annoyingly loud or feels unstable. Among the brands Florez recommends are TrimLine, Precor, Nautilus and StarTrac.

Q I jog three times a week for 30 minutes and do a body-sculpting class twice a week. Do I need two pairs of shoes, or will one suffice for both running and body sculpting?

A Only shoes designed specifically for running will have enough support and shock absorption to handle the demands of the sport, says Manhattan podiatrist Oliver Zong, D.P.M., director of NYC Footcare. "With every stride you take while running, a force equivalent to three to four times your body weight is placed across your feet, ankles and knees," he says.

Running shoes don''t offer significant lateral (side-to-side) support, so for activities like a body-sculpting class that involve a lot of this kind of motion, you will need cross trainers, which can help prevent injuries such as ankle sprains.

Another reason to have a dedicated pair of running shoes is that it makes it easier to keep track of the "wear mileage." As a rule, running shoes should be replaced after every 300-500 miles of use--closer to 300 if you run outdoors. "If you are using the same pair of sneakers for other activities, keeping track of mileage will be more difficult, and the shoes will show signs of wear sooner," Zong adds.

Q I have tried for years to do a split, but I never seem to get there. How can this 32-year-old body of mine finally develop that flexibility?
A "Being able to do a split isn''t necessarily a marker of a healthy body," says Laveen Naidu, director of the Dance Theatre of Harlem School in New York City. "Not everybody can do it. You''re born with a certain natural range of flexibility that you can increase to an extent but not beyond." That said, if you''re one of those people with the potential to do a split (or you could do one in grade school), you may be able to do so after four to six weeks of diligent, daily stretching.

Before stretching, though, it''s important that you warm up your muscles with 10 minutes of light cardio. Since hamstring flexibility is the key to doing a split, Naidu recommends performing a variety of rear-thigh stretches. For instance, stand up straight with your feet slightly apart, tuck your chin to your chest, then progressively roll your head and body down, taking eight counts, until you are looking at your knees or shins (you should feel a stretch in your hamstrings). Pause, then slowly reverse the process, keeping your chin to your chest as you roll up; breathe steadily.

You can''t rush flexibility training. If you stretch too far, "the muscle recoils to protect itself," Naidu says. Hold each stretch for 30-60 seconds without bouncing. More important than how far you push a stretch is how often you do it, ideally once a day (and always after five to 10 minutes of a cardio warm-up).

In addition to daily stretching, it''s important to do lower-body strengthening exercises two or three times a week. Choose moves that also stretch your hip flexors, which will help you achieve a split. One of the best strength exercises for this is the forward lunge. It strengthens your quadriceps, hamstrings, butt and calves and also stretches your hip flexors when you lower your back knee toward the floor.

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Even if you don''t make it all the way to a full split, Naidu says, stick with daily stretching for all of your muscles--including your upper body. "When you''re flexible, your posture is better, and you run less of a risk of injury."

Send your questions to Shape, Fitness Q & A, 21100 Erwin St., Woodland Hills, CA 91367; fax to (818) 704-7620; e-mail to FitnessQ&A@Shape.com.

Suzanne Schlosberg is the author of Fitness for Travelers (Houghton Mifflin).

COPYRIGHT Weider Publications
COPYRIGHT Gale Group


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